Little Mombo, Okavango Delta, Botswana

Little Mombo is a Premier Camp

Wildlife at Little Mombo Camp

The Mombo Concession is known as the “place of plenty”, highlighted by the massive concentrations of plains game and predators that can be seen. These include all the big cats, of which lion sightings are frequent. You can also expect to see leopard and cheetah, spotted hyaena, large herds of buffalo, elephant, white rhino, giraffe, blue wildebeest, Burchell's zebra and much more. Birdlife is prolific around Mombo with African jacana, pygmy-geese, goliath heron and migrant waders in summer being particularly common.

What you can see at Little Mombo Camp

  • First time to Africa
  • Travelled to Africa
  • Seasoned Traveller

Latest Little Mombo Album

Submitted by: Cayley Christos, Oct 23, 2013

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Latest News From Little Mombo

  • Mombo Camp - July 2012
    Aug 6, 2012

    The resident herds of red lechwe, impala, elephant and not forgetting the slow ambling Cape buffalo have been visiting camp on a regular basis during the day whilst the incessant chomping through the shallow waters of the hippopotamus...

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  • Lions Dine at Little Mombo
    Jul 28, 2012

    Upon investigating, we found four lioness on a fresh impala kill. We immediately alerted all camp staff and guides. The guides were not far from camp, so they all executed a sharp U-turn and came for a closer look - all this before the...

    » Read the full story
  • Little Mombo - February 2008
    Mar 12, 2008

    LionAs in past years, especially February 2006, the Mombo lions tended to start climbing trees. We are not entirely sure why they are doing this - possibly to avoid flies, or perhaps simply to keep their feet dry amidst all this water?

    » Read the full story

As recommended on TripAdvisor

“ Spent three amazing days at Mombo camp. It lived up to its strong reputation as we saw abundant and varied animals on every drive - droves of elephants, rhino, lions, lion cubs, hyena cubs, leopard, even a successful wild dug hunt. ”
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Reviewed by: Uncommontraveler, 2015.04.25