A Day With The Dogs At Seba

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Tim Gaunt reports on an extraordinary Okavango safari involving a pack of wild dogs at Seba Camp…

A Day With The Dogs At Seba

We’ve been anticipating the wild dogs’ return here at Seba for a few months now. They arrived yesterday with 10 four-month old pups in tow. So I decided to get up early this morning and follow them on their morning jaunt… with some great results!

A Day With The Dogs At Seba

The baboon was a mild source of entertainment at the start of their hunt. Because of his size, agility and strength, it never got too serious but there was a lot of shouting involved.

A Day With The Dogs At Seba

The hyaena (along with a few others) trailed the dogs for two hours and about 5 km, hoping to cash in on anything they might serve up. Unfortunately for him, his persistence evoked nothing but petulance from the dogs and eventually they gave him a piece of their minds. He was lucky to escape with a few nips and just a bit of bleeding.

A Day With The Dogs At Seba

A Day With The Dogs At Seba

A Day With The Dogs At Seba

One thing about wild dogs is that they almost always provide a bit of action!

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By Tim Gaunt

Although Tim grew up in Cape Town, his family spent a lot of time exploring the great game reserves and wild places of southern Africa. All this time outside fostered a love for nature that been pumping through his veins since a young age (in a grade 1 “essay” he wrote how he wanted to be a game ranger when he grew up). After finishing school, he got a degree in Nature Conservation and started working in Etosha National Park in Namibia in 2005. In addition, he was trained as a guide by Wilderness Safaris. Since then, he has worked as a guide at Mala Mala (on the border of the Kruger) and Amakhala (Eastern Cape) game reserves, managed Rocktail Bay Lodge (on the KwaZulu Natal coast), completed a postgraduate degree in education, and for the past 2 years, managed Seba Camp in the Okavango with his wife, Hailey. For Tim, it’s all about the peace and drama of the bush. “You never know what you’re going to find out here... every day is different, every day there’s something new to learn.”

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