Exciting Times Ahead for the Wild Dogs of the Linyanti

  • Share on:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest

I woke up this morning to the sound of an animal in distress just outside King’s Pool, but could only see a big crocodile patrolling the waterways in front of camp. This was followed by the audio of wild dogs calling one another. It turned out that the guides had just seen the LTC Pack bring down a waterbuck just east of the soccer pitch!

The adrenaline was pumping as they watched in awe while the wild dogs tore their way through the carcass – even though it was a bad morning for the waterbuck, we are very excited as this big meal for the wild dogs is great news as they are almost certainly denning very nearby and need all the food they can get to raise their pups. For now, we believe the den is fairly deep into the mopane south of camp. We hope to find it but either way the constant presence of these predators in the area means we have had fantastic viewing over the last few weeks as they almost always come and hunt along the riverine areas.

The alpha female was also present this morning which is very interesting. Last month she was pregnant and has clearly given birth, perhaps as long ago as three weeks back. With the pack always returning to the same area after the hunt, we are confident that all is going well for now. Fingers crossed because this remarkable pack has raised pups to adulthood for five of the last six denning seasons.

The LTC Pack currently stands at nine: three experienced adults and six yearlings. If all goes well, the next few months should provide some fantastic wild dog viewing!

Written and Photographed by Nic Proust

  • Share on:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
Previous Next

By Nic Proust – Environmental Ecologist. Botswana

Nic worked for Wilderness Safaris as an Environmental Ecologist from 2012 to early 2017. "It has been a huge privilege to work as a conservationist in one of the most beautiful and wild areas in the world! At the beginning of 2012 I joined the Environmental Department of the Wilderness Safaris team in Botswana - working as their Environmental Ecologist. Having grown up spending almost every weekend and holiday in the fynbos or bush somewhere in southern Africa, I continued to follow my lifelong dream of working as a game ranger and eventually worked as a guide in the Greater Kruger National Park area for just short of two years. A few years of travelling and working in a photo studio but I was desperate to work back in the wild. A combination of my love for the area, the people I work with and meet as well as the variety of tasks keeps me learning while the overall conservation importance of my job keeps me hopelessly addicted!"

More by this contributor

Comments