Jao Camp - November 2017

Nov 21, 2017 Jao Camp
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Climate and Landscape
November’s arrival signified the start of the rains, albeit only a slight hint of what’s to come. The days were hot, reaching maximum temperatures of 42° Celsius which then dropped to a minimum of 12° C. We recorded 7.5 mm of rain during the month and some pretty strong wind storms. The clouds would build up most afternoons only to be blown away by the strong winds. Some wind storms caused a bit of havoc and left the camp littered with branches and leaves. We hope that December will bring us the rains that we need.

The water levels dropped quite significantly, resulting in us mov
ing our boat to Kubu Lagoon. The boat activity now includes a game drive to and from the boat station.   
Wildlife  
With the water levels having dropped in front of camp, the narrow channel left behind has allowed for excellent sightings of red lechwe jumping across the channel – a sight synonymous with the Okavango Delta. Herds of elephant provided thrilling sightings from the lounge area, along with buffalo, kudu, reedbuck and baboons, to name just a few.


The start of summer and the rains that we did have brought on the births of young red lechwe, tsessebe and impala, ensuring that our trips to Hunda Island were very productive. We had sightings of wild dog, leopard, lion, elephant and plenty of general game which included zebra, kudu, wildebeest and giraffe.
Birds and Birding

The resident Pel’s fishing-owl was seen on most evenings in front of Jao eyeing out the fish in the shrinking pools here while paradise flycatchers, woodland kingfishers and striped kingfishers were all pretty vocal around camp.

An important bird sighting for us this month was a pair of African skimmers that was regularly seen at Hippo Bridge. A first for most and always a special sighting for all.

Staff in Camp
Managers: Malcolm Peacock, Michelle Burger, Charl Berg, Okker Stoltz, Vivian Beukes, Thato Phala, Marina Lunga
Guides: Jakes Tembwe, Tjandapiwa Lesife, Paul Moleseng, Meshack Mbwe

Climate and Landscape
November’s arrival signified the start of the rains, albeit only a slight hint of what’s to come. The days were hot, reaching maximum temperatures of 42° Celsius which then dropped to a minimum of 12° C. We recorded 7.5 mm of rain during the month and some pretty strong wind storms. The clouds would build up most afternoons only to be blown away by the strong winds. Some wind storms caused a bit of havoc and left the camp littered with branches and leaves. We hope that December will bring us the rains that we need.
The water levels dropped quite significantly, resulting in us moving our boat to Kubu Lagoon. The boat activity now includes a game drive to and from the boat station.   
Wildlife  
With the water levels having dropped in front of camp, the narrow channel left behind has allowed for excellent sightings of red lechwe jumping across the channel – a sight synonymous with the Okavango Delta. Herds of elephant provided thrilling sightings from the lounge area, along with buffalo, kudu, reedbuck and baboons, to name just a few.
The start of summer and the rains that we did have brought on the births of young red lechwe, tsessebe and impala, ensuring that our trips to Hunda Island were very productive. We had sightings of wild dog, leopard, lion, elephant and plenty of general game which included zebra, kudu, wildebeest and giraffe.
Birds and Birding
The resident Pel’s fishing-owl was seen on most evenings in front of Jao eyeing out the fish in the shrinking pools here while paradise flycatchers, woodland kingfishers and striped kingfishers were all pretty vocal around camp.
An important bird sighting for us this month was a pair of African skimmers that was regularly seen at Hippo Bridge. A first for most and always a special sighting for all.
Staff in Camp
Managers: Malcolm Peacock, Michelle Burger, Charl Berg, Okker Stoltz, Vivian Beukes, Thato Phala, Marina Lunga
Guides: Jakes Tembwe, Tjandapiwa Lesife, Paul Moleseng, Meshack Mbwe
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