Kwetsani Camp - October 2017

Oct 20, 2017 Kwetsani Camp
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Climate and Landscape
Typical hot October weather descended upon us with force. Most days at the beginning of the month reached the high 30°s Celsius in the shade! The nights hovered around the 20° C mark but as the month progressed we were shocked to have two small rain showers, and even had a decent 22 mm of rain towards the end of the month; rare, but welcomed with open arms by every living thing at Kwetsani.

Wildlife
It was an amazing month for lion sightings in and around Kwetsani. We saw an old female lioness walk through the staff village and the back-of-house area with three cubs, causing mayhem for the local baboon troop and the resident bushbuck.

Around the concession guests were treated to various different lion groupings, and on one particular day managed to see 11 lions scattered all over Jao Concession.

We were also visited almost daily by herds of elephant and were lucky enough to watch two different groups, numbering 15 and 14 respectively, come together on the floodplain with excited greetings between the older herd members and playful charging between the young bulls, trying to scare each other with their “impressive displays”.

A few of our guests had the privilege of seeing three leopards in one day, one from their helicopter flight on their way back to camp and two more on Hunda Island that same afternoon!

We were treated to many amazing sightings of the smaller kind as well, including the birth of a bushbuck and the resident banded mongoose family causing havoc with any who dared cross their path, from human toes to kudu cows that were too inquisitive.

Birds and Birding
We had great sightings all over our area, from a Verreaux’s eagle-owl patrolling the camp at night and sometimes seen in the early evenings, to Endangered wattled crane and southern ground-hornbill spotted on the floodplain on an almost daily basis.

We were lucky to watch an impressive gathering of marabou storks, cattle egrets, black storks and saddle-billed storks all skimming the same small drying water channel for anything they could clamp their beaks around.

Staff in Camp
Guides and Managers: Juan Fourie, Alzaane Bock, Moyo Kapinga, Dennis Smith, Kgaga Kgaga

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