Little Tubu & Tubu Tree Camp - June 2017

Jun 14, 2017 Tubu Tree Camp, Little Tubu
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Climate and Landscape
It was a great month at Tubu and Little Tubu from a weather perspective with most days providing comfortable temperatures averaging around 25° Celsius. Don’t get me wrong, the mornings are a little chilly and cool, but that’s not something we really worry about as the guides happily provide cosy hot-water bottles and ponchos for the drives to keep guests snug in the early morning crisp air.

The water is still clearly visible from the front of camp and in the area although the level has dropped, particularly in the northern areas of the concession, showing clear signs that the water is making its way south towards Maun.

Wildlife
As always it’s hard to pinpoint specific highlights of the last month’s sightings but there are always some favourites. Many of the guests have returned from drives particularly mentioning the interactions of our resident lion pride. The two adult females have done extremely well raising and teaching their youngsters, taking each day as it comes and trying to show them the valuable life skills required to survive as one of Africa’s apex predators. They made many valuable kills this month, on some occasions killing more than one or two wildebeest or zebra per night. The mothers generally hold down their prey to teach the youngsters the valuable lesson of how to properly and efficiently suffocate their intended meal.

Another highlight for this past month has to be the great influx of elephant activity providing some beautiful sightings of large herds wandering through the great expanse of open plains around the camp, even seeing them cross the slightly deeper waters as they attempt to move from one island to the next.

Birds and Birding
With most of the migrant birds having moved on it does make for some interesting birding; that is, not seeing as much of the expected species. However, this does not put a dampener on the birding side of things. In fact, the receding water in some areas has resulted in large numbers of water birds flocking to the newly-exposed shallow waters. African openbill storks have been seen in large numbers – close to 50 birds together in some areas while the small but beautiful malachite kingfishers are seen all along the edges of the main water channels. These are just a few of the beautiful birds we expect to see this season.

Staff in Camp
Managers: John Nott, Dominique Nott, Jared Zeelie, Philile Hlongwe
Guides: Phenyo Lebakeng, Onaletha Radipitse, Kambango Sinimbo,Kelebeng Mahupe, Kesentse Rams

 

 

 

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