Pelo Camp - November 2017

Nov 16, 2017 Pelo Camp
  • Share on:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest

Climate and Landscape
Spring is drawing to a close and the soaring temperatures, burgeoning cumulonimbus clouds and woodland kingfishers have all announced summer in no uncertain terms. Some mornings started a little cooler, with our average minimum temperature settling at 10° Celsius. However, the days warmed up quickly to an average daily maximum of 33° C, with the mercury maxing out at 39° C for the month.

With the honour of the first rains going to October we enjoyed regular additions to the precipitation record during November. We received about 30 mm of rain this last month – however, not enough to offset the continued transpiration and evaporation, and so water levels continued to drop steadily.

Wildlife
Pelo has no fences around the camp so elephants in the area can wander through without hindrance. We have a couple of regulars who come for the mokolwane palm nuts in September/October, the figs whenever they’re ripe, and palms for the rest of the time. We see breeding herds pass by through the water, but we very seldom have them on the island. Sometimes the lone bulls interfere with camp comings and goings, but it’s all part of the charm to have another nightcap at the bar waiting for the elephant to move past until we can take our guests to their tents.

Birds and Birding
We were pretty lucky seeing some rather rare species this month. In the early mornings we saw the African skimmers, a Near Threatened species of aquatic bird, flying past Pelo on their way to our Hippo Pools Bridge. On airstrip transfers we would sometimes see them skimming or having a midday nap. As yet we have not managed to catch one skimming, in focus, on camera. They say patience is a virtue…

With summer comes the arrival of the long-awaited woodland kingfisher. This insectivorous member of the kingfisher family, with its electric blue feathers on its back, wings and tail, pearl white belly and black shoulders, is no mime. The males belt out a trilling call that is very distinctive as they proclaim their territory. When you have five of them vying for the same island there are some fantastic feathered displays and aerial acrobatics in store for all onlookers.

Staff in Camp
Managers: Jacques Bester and Nadia Botha
Guides: Moruti Maipelo and David Mapodise

 

  • Share on:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
Previous Next

Comments