The Waiting Game: Lesson 1

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When you're too lazy for the chase, you resort to group digging!

While you dig, your sister watches over you, then she pokes her head into the hole and tells you to dig some more!

This is the scene that unfolded at Mombo as I watched a pride of lionesses as they took turns trying their luck at the entrance of an active warthog den. Two hours later and you'd expect them to be rewarded, right? Maybe a little piggy each?

Well, not today. Today's digging is tough. With sand under their claws and defeat across their brows, the females decided to leave the den to try some good old-fashioned hunting instead.

Doc Malinda, one of Mombo's famous guides, decided to follow up on the hunting felines, so I headed back to camp to ensure all other guests were being taken care of. Doc’s guests enjoyed watching the lionesses who had returned to the den. They were so absorbed that they had forgotten about lunch, so we decided to send lunch to them: a surprise bush picnic to their vehicle so that they could watch with food and drinks in hand! Off I went as meals on wheels back to the sighting.

But as is often the case, nature called and some of the guests on Doc’s vehicle needed a lavatory break! This is where I popped in, deciding to keep a watchful eye on the fast-moving pride.

Now we all know not to take our eye off the ball right? Well, there you have it – Doc’s guests took their eyes off the ball and it was all over in seconds! The photographs show the action as it happened and I ended up being the lucky one to witness their eventual success.

I was reminded once again that nature is a waiting game, and the more you wait, the more you're rewarded – but sometimes, Lady Luck rules.

Written and Photographed by Deon de Villiers

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By Deon de Villiers

I have always had a passion for photographing wildlife and the natural world in any aspect. My aim has been to photograph the beauty around me and to ultimately build a database of images which will remind me of the road I have travelled... it's a personal thing, which luckily I am today able to share with those that are interested and who share the same passion. Today Kym and I live in Botswana with our two little children, and I manage the operations for number of Wilderness Safaris Delta based camps.

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