The Way of the Wild

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Kyle De Nobrega and Ruth Nussbaum of C4PhotoSafaris recently spent several days exploring our camps in Botswana. After packing up and heading to the airstrip on their final day they came across one of the most surprising sightings of the whole trip…

As the rising sun starts heating up the surface of the Linyanti floodplain, the surrounding woodland following suit, the general trend of animal behaviour tends to taper off. The rule is that the hotter it gets, animal activity with most species decreases and by around 9-10 am it makes for the perfect time to find an ancient tree to enjoy a cup of coffee beneath.

So the story goes at least...

On our way slowly towards the airstrip after an exceptional five days in the Linyanti, we stopped the vehicle to get something from one of our luggage bags.

The loud distinctive bark from a kudu resonated from within a thick stand of apple leaf woodland to our east, a sure sign of a predator walking within sight of the kudu. Kudus never lie!

Following up on the direction of her alarm call, we eventually located a single female kudu. Running around in circles she barked in confusion, incredibly unusual behaviour as we expected her to give away the direction of where the predator was seen.

After she repeatedly returned to the same spot, barking and alarming towards the ground, we eventually found what this unusual behaviour was all about.

Motionless, her young calf lay wrapped in a coil of one of the biggest African rock pythons we have ever seen.

Have you ever seen something like this before? Click here to view another set of images taken at Kings Pool showing similar behaviour between a python and impala.

Written and Photographed by Kyle De Nobrega and Ruth Nussbaum C4PhotoSafaris

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